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    Princess Eugenie is disliked by royals for leaking information to Prince Harry and Meghan?

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    Royal biographer and author Angela Levin is known as a staunch opponent of Meghan Markle and Prince. Hardly a day goes by when she doesn’t target the US-based couple on social media or during her TV appearances.

    The royal expert recently retweeted a post which claimed that Princess Eugenie has been outed within the family for leaking information about events, or secret plans and other information to the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

    “She has effectively been cut off from the Cambridges, Tindalls, Philips, Anne Wessexes, Queen, Charles and Camilla,” read the post.

    Princess Eugenie is disliked by royals for leaking information to Prince Harry and Meghan?

    Eugenie her elder sister Beatrice and other family are currently in Switzerland  ski trip.

    According to a report, they are very upset after their father Prince Andrew decided to opt out of a family trip.

    The Duke of York is said to have consoled his daughters through daily Skype calls



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    Djokovic admits ‘errors’ as he fights to avoid Australian deportation

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    Novak Djokovic is currently ranked as world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals. — Reuters/File
    • Novak Djokovic admits errors in his travel papers and to meet journalist after claimed COVID-19.
    • Australian government ponders whether to cancel his visa, again and throw him out of the country.
    • Many Australians are angered about Djokovic’s vaccine exemption.

    Novak Djokovic on Wednesday admitted “errors” in his travel papers and to meeting a journalist after a claimed coronavirus infection, as he battled to stay in Australia and fight for a record 21st Grand Slam title.

    The men’s world number one made the admission in an Instagram post as attention focused on his movements before he flew to Melbourne for the Australian Open.

    Djokovic said his team had offered fresh information to the Australian government, which is pondering whether to cancel his visa, again, and throw him out of the country.

    “We are living in challenging times in a global pandemic and sometimes these mistakes can occur,” the unvaccinated 34-year-old said in a statement released as he practised on the courts of the Open, which starts Monday.

    The Serbian star flew into Australia a week ago claiming a vaccine exemption because of a positive PCR test result on December 16.

    Border agents rejected his exemption saying a recent infection was an insufficient reason, tore up his visa and placed him in a detention centre.

    But the vaccine-sceptic Djokovic’s high-powered legal team dramatically overturned the visa decision in court on Monday on a procedural matter related to his airport interview.

    Now, Immigration Minister Alex Hawke says he is considering cancelling the visa another time, as fresh doubts emerge about Djokovic’s travels in the two weeks before he arrived in Australia.

    In an update to Australian media, Hawke’s spokesman acknowledged receiving “lengthy further submissions” from the player’s lawyers.

    “Naturally, this will affect the timeframe for a decision,” he said.

    ‘Error of judgement’

    Djokovic, a nine-time Australian Open champion, described reports about his post-infection outings in Serbia as “misinformation”.

    On the day of his claimed positive test in Serbia, he appeared at a ceremony to honour him with stamps bearing his image. The following day he attended a youth tennis event. He appeared at both apparently without a mask.

    Djokovic, who made no mention of the stamp ceremony, said he only received the PCR test result after attending the children’s tennis event.

    But he admitted that he also went ahead with an interview with French sports daily L’Equipe on December 18.

    “I felt obliged to go ahead and conduct the L’Equipe interview as I didn´t want to let the journalist down but did ensure I socially distanced and wore a mask except when my photograph was being taken,” he said.

    “On reflection, this was an error of judgement and I accept that I should have rescheduled this commitment.”

    The journalist who carried out the L’Equipe interview, Franck Ramella, said Djokovic’s representatives had told him not to ask about Covid-19 vaccinations.

    Ramella said: “The instructions were clear — no questions about vaccination.”

    The reporter said he had been unaware at the time of the interview that Djokovic was Covid-positive.

    Support team ‘made mistake’

    The tennis ace also admitted a mistake on his Australian travel declaration, in which a box was ticked indicating that he had not, or would not, travel in the 14 days before flying to Melbourne.

    In fact, social media posts and reports show he flew from Serbia to Spain during that period.

    “This was submitted by my support team on my behalf,” Djokovic said.

    “My agent sincerely apologises for the administrative mistake in ticking the incorrect box about my previous travel before coming to Australia. This was a human error and certainly not deliberate.”

    In another twist, Australian media on Wednesday seized on reporting by Germany’s Der Spiegel newspaper that cast doubt over Djokovic’s positive test.

    The newspaper said it had scanned the QR code on his Serbian PCR test, which it said delivered a negative result, only to change to a positive result an hour later.

    It was not possible to independently verify the Der Spiegel story.

    Appeal options 

    Djokovic’s Instagram post appeared to be aimed at swaying the Australian government to let him stay.

    Leading immigration lawyer Christopher Levingston said the government could cancel Djokovic’s visa on narrow criminal grounds, for example, because the travel declaration was incorrectly completed.

    But the immigration minister may also annul the visa on broader character grounds.

    If Djokovic knowingly dodged Serbia’s quarantine requirement for positive cases, he could be judged to be a risk for potentially not complying with public health orders while in Australia, Levingston said.

    Various options to appeal would be open for both Djokovic and the government, but at the end of the day, the immigration minister can exercise his personal power to cancel the visa.

    Many Australians, who have endured nearly two years of travel bans, restrictions and rolling lockdowns, were angered when they learned of Djokovic’s vaccine exemption.

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s government, which faces a general election by May, has been criticised over its handling of the affair.

    Djokovic’s visa ban was overturned only after the government conceded it had acted unreasonably by not giving him the promised time to put his case at the airport.

    Since then, Djokovic’s Covid-19 test and his actions before touching down in Australia have come under greater media scrutiny.



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    The metaverse will be filled with ‘elves’ – TechCrunch

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    Some say the metaverse is nothing but marketing hype, while others insist it will transform society. I fall into the latter camp, but I’m not talking about cartoon worlds filled with avatars like many are pitching.

    Instead, I believe the true metaverse – the one that will change society — will be an augmentation layer on the real world, and within 10 years it will be the foundation of our lives, impacting everything from shopping and socializing to business and education.

    I also believe that a corporate-controlled metaverse is dangerous to society and requires aggressive regulation. That’s because the platform providers will be able to manipulate consumers in ways that will make social media seem quaint. Most people resonate with concerns around data collection and privacy, but they overlook what will be the most dangerous technology in the metaverse – artificial intelligence.

    The most dangerous part of the metaverse: agenda-driven artificial agents that look and act like other users but are actually simulated personas controlled by AI.

    In fact, if you ask people to name the core technologies of the metaverse, they’ll usually focus on the eyewear and maybe mention the graphics engines, 5G or even blockchain. But those are just the nuts and bolts of our immersive future – the technology that will pull the strings in the metaverse, creating (and manipulating) our experience, is AI.

    Artificial intelligence will be just as important to our virtual future as the headsets that get all the attention. And the most dangerous part of the metaverse will be agenda-driven artificial agents that look and act like other users but are actually simulated personas controlled by AI. They will engage us in “conversational manipulation,” targeting us on behalf of paying advertisers without us realizing they aren’t real.

    This is especially dangerous when the AI algorithms have access to data about our personal interests and beliefs, habits and temperament, all while monitoring our emotional state by reading our facial expressions and vocal inflections.

    If you think targeted ads in social media are manipulative, it’s nothing compared to the conversational agents that will engage us in the metaverse. They will pitch us more skillfully than any human salesperson, and it won’t just be to sell us gadgets – they will push political propaganda and targeted misinformation on behalf of the highest bidder.

    And because these AI agents will look and sound like anyone else in the metaverse, our natural skepticism to advertising will not protect us. For these reasons, we need to regulate AI-driven conversational agents, especially when they have access to our facial and vocal affects, enabling our emotions to be used against us in real time.

    If we don’t regulate this, ads in the form of AI-driven avatars will sense when you’re skeptical and change tactics in mid-sentence, quickly zeroing in on the words and images that impact you personally. As I wrote in 2016, if an AI can learn to beat the world’s best chess and Go players, learning to sway consumers to buy things (and believe things) that aren’t in our interest is child’s play.

    But of all the technologies headed our way, it’s what I call the “elf” that will be the most powerful and subtle form of coercion in the metaverse. These “electronic life facilitators” are the natural evolution of digital assistants like Siri and Alexa, but they won’t be disembodied voices in the metaverse. They’ll be anthropomorphized personas customized for each consumer.

    The platform providers will market these AI agents as virtual life coaches and they will be persistent throughout your day as you navigate the metaverse. And because the metaverse will ultimately be an augmentation layer upon the real world, these digital elves will be with you everywhere, whether you are shopping or working or just hanging out.

    And just like the marketing agents described above, these elves will have access to your facial expressions and vocal inflections along with a detailed data history of your life, nudging you toward actions and activities, products and services, even political views.

    And no, they won’t be like the crude chatbots of today, but embodied characters you’ll come to think of as trusted figures in your life – a mix between a familiar friend, helpful adviser and caring therapist. And yet, your elf will know you in ways no friend ever could, for it will be monitoring all aspects of your life down to your blood pressure and respiration rate (via your trusty smartwatch).

    Yes, this sounds creepy, which is why platform providers will make them cute and non-threatening, with innocent features and mannerisms that seem more like a magical character in your own “life adventure” than a human-sized assistant following you around. This is why I use the word “elf” to describe them, as they might appear to you as a fairy hovering over your shoulder or maybe a gremlin or alien – a small anthropomorphic character that can whisper in your ear or fly out in front of you to draw attention to things in your augmented world it wants you to focus on.

    This is where it gets especially dangerous — without regulation, these life facilitators will be hijacked by paying advertisers, targeting you with greater skill and precision than anything on today’s social media. And unlike ads of today, these intelligent agents will be following you around, guiding you through your day, and doing it with a cute smile or giggly laugh.

    To help convey what this will be like, both positive and negative, I’ve written a short narrative, Metaverse 2030, that portrays how AI will drive our immersive lives by 2030 and beyond.

    Ultimately, the technologies of VR, AR and AI have the potential to enrich and improve our lives. But when combined, these innovations become especially dangerous, as they all have one powerful trait in common – they can make us believe that computer-generated content is authentic, even if it’s an agenda-driven fabrication. It’s this powerful ability for digital deception that should make us fear an AI-enabled metaverse, especially when controlled by powerful corporations that sell third-party access to its users for promotional purposes.

    I raise these concerns in the hope that consumers and industry leaders will push for meaningful regulation before the problems become so ingrained in the technology of the metaverse that they’re impossible to undo.



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    Key nominations for the 2022 Screen Actors Guild awards

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    Nominations for the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) Awards were announced on Wednesday for the best performances in film and television in 2021. The winners will be announced at a televised ceremony on Feb. 27.

    BEST MOVIE CAST

    “Belfast”

    “Coda”

    “Don’t Look Up”

    “House of Gucci”

    “King Richard”

    BEST TELEVISION DRAMA SERIES CAST

    “The Handmaid’s Tale”

    “The Morning Show”

    “Squid Game”

    “Succession”

    “Yellowstone”

    BEST TELEVISION COMEDY SERIES ENSEMBLE

    “The Great”

    “Hacks”

    “The Kominsky Method”

    “Only Murders in the Building”

    “Ted Lasso”

    BEST ACTOR, MOVIE

    Javier Bardem, “Being the Ricardos”

    Benedict Cumberbatch, “The Power of the Dog”

    Andrew Garfield, “Tick, Tick … Boom!”

    Will Smith, “King Richard”

    Denzel Washington, “The Tragedy of Macbeth”

    BEST ACTRESS, MOVIE

    Jessica Chastain, “The Eyes of Tammy Faye”

    Olivia Colman, “The Lost Daughter”

    Lady Gaga, “House of Gucci”

    Jennifer Hudson, “Respect”

    Nicole Kidman, “Being the Ricardos”

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS, MOVIE

    Caitriona Balfe, “Belfast”

    Cate Blanchett, “Nightmare Alley”

    Ariana DeBose, “West Side Story”

    Kirsten Dunst, “The Power of the Dog”

    Ruth Negga, “Passing”

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR, MOVIE

    Ben Affleck, “The Tender Bar”

    Bradley Cooper, “Licorice Pizza”

    Troy Kotsur, “CODA”

    Jared Leto, “House of Gucci”

    Kodi Smit-McPhee, “The Power of the Dog”

    BEST ACTRESS, TV DRAMA

    Jennifer Aniston, “The Morning Show”

    Jung Ho-Yeon, “Squid Game”

    Elisabeth Moss, “The Handmaid’s Tale”

    Sarah Snook, “Succession”

    Reese Witherspoon, “The Morning Show”

    BEST ACTOR, TV DRAMA

    Brian Cox, “Succession”

    Billy Crudup, “The Morning Show”

    Kieran Culkin, “Succession”

    Lee Jung-Jae, “Squid Game”

    Jeremy Strong, “Succession”

    BEST ACTRESS, TV COMEDY

    Elle Fanning, “The Great”

    Sandra Oh, “The Chair”

    Jean Smart, “Hacks”

    Juno Temple, “Ted Lasso”

    Hannah Waddingham, “Ted Lasso”

    BEST ACTOR, TV COMEDY

    Michael Douglas, “The Kominsky Method”

    Brett Goldstein, “Ted Lasso”

    Steve Martin, “Only Murders in the Building”

    Martin Short, “Only Murders in the Building”

    Jason Sudeikis, “Ted Lasso”



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    Friendly match between Yorkshire Country Club, Lahore Qalandar postponed

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    Logos of Yorkshire County Cricket Club (L) and PSL franchise Lahore Qalandars. — Twitter/File
    • YCCC announces first step on its search for cricketing talent.
    • The two clubs earlier inked agreement for players development.
    • Time and dates for the trials will be announced in due course.

    A friendly match between Yorkshire County Cricket Club (YCCC) and Lahore Qalandar, scheduled for January 16, has been postponed owing to the ongoing COVID-19 developments globally.

    “For the safety and wellness of all players, it has been decided that it is appropriate to reschedule the match to a later date, which will be confirmed in due course,” the statement issued by the club read.

    It further announced the first step on its search for undiscovered cricketing talent following the recently agreed partnership between the two clubs.

    It said: “In summer 2022, aspiring players over 18-years-old will be invited to demonstrate their cricketing potential during trials across the four regions of North, East, South and West Yorkshire in front of a selection panel led by the interim YCCC Managing Director Darren Gough, alongside representatives from the Qalandars coaching team.”

    The club mentioned that time and dates for the trials are currently being finalised and will be announced in due course.

    According to the details, the most talented players will be divided into four teams to play in a final. From these games, the best two females and best two male cricketers will be chosen for scholarships with Yorkshire County Cricket Club, including the opportunity to travel to Lahore and train at the Qalandars’ elite high-performance centre, as well as a full kit bag provided for all the winners to keep.

    Speaking on the occasion, Yorkshire Cricket Interim Managing Director Darren Gough said: “I am thrilled to be able to welcome undiscovered talent to Headingley. Across Yorkshire, and the UK, there are so many amateur clubs with fantastic standards of cricket, and I am passionate about making sure talented players from all backgrounds are given the chance to access better facilities, develop their skills, and train with some of the best players in the world.”

    Meanwhile, Lahore Qalandars Chief Operating Officer Sameen Rana said: “We are delighted to have built a partnership with Yorkshire County Cricket Club. Our player development programme has been an essential tool to discovering new talent in Pakistan and opening up the sport to those who previously felt unable to access it, and we are looking forward to sharing our learnings as the partnership develops.”



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    Unicorn exits augur poorly as Justworks delays IPO, citing ‘market conditions’ – TechCrunch

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    Justworks, a venture-backed software startup focused on the HR market for small and medium-sized businesses, announced earlier today that it would delay its IPO. In a statement to TechCrunch, Justworks said that it “decided to delay its IPO due to market conditions at this time.”

    An IPO delay is just that, a public debut pushed back. But Justworks’ decision to put its public offering on temporary hiatus comes on the heels of rapid declines in the value of recent technology debuts employing traditional IPOs, SPACs and direct listings. Even more, Justworks’ now-delayed IPO follows a selloff in the value of software and technology shares more generally.

    Is there something bigger afoot than one company’s stumble?

    Reading the tea leaves

    The Justworks IPO delay is the latest data point in what could be a worsening exit market for unicorns. Otherwise, we wouldn’t make a fuss.

    Why? Sometimes when a private company wants to go public, it finds that public-market investors are not willing to buy its shares at the price it had in mind. By taking more time, the IPO hopeful can tidy up its numbers, perhaps answering some of its critics head-on with results or business tweaks. Once the company has tuned its performance and image, it can try to float once again.

    Such a private-public disconnect can stem from a gap between a company’s results, what it thinks they are worth, and the public market’s view of the particular firm in question. Alternatively, a similar disconnect can arise from the public markets simply being on a different page regarding valuations than the private markets. Our read of the Justworks news is that it’s likely dealing with at least the latter issue, and perhaps the former as well.

    The possibility of a gap between how private investors value growth-focused tech companies and how the stock market values those companies matters because of how many richly valued tech startups need to find an exit in the coming year. In bad news for those companies, a number of factors likely made Justworks’ IPO timing difficult, hinting that other unicorns could also struggle to exit in today’s investing climate.



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    Man sets ‘slow internet equipment’ on fire; sentenced to seven years in jail

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    Representational image. — iStock/File
    • Man loses patience and sets internet equipment on fire because of slow internet connection.
    • He is slapped with seven-year jail term.
    • Uses lighter to set napkin on fire and destroys public box containing optical fibre network cables.

    Internet is a need of survival for the world, professional and personal work can be catered through it in no time, but lagging internet connectivity surely does get on everyone’s nerves.

    According to NDTV, a man surnamed Lan in China has been sentenced to seven years in jail as he lost his mind over receiving a slow internet connection. Frustrated with the slow speed, he set the internet equipment on fire, authorities have said. 

    Last June, in an internet café in southern Guangxi province, Lan got frustrated with the connection speed spilling over.

    In response, he destroyed a public box containing optical fibre network cables, a local court said in a statement on Monday.

    The court said: “The man used a lighter to set a napkin he had on him on fire, then burned down a telecommunications box at a traffic intersection”.

    Approximately 4,000 households and offices, including a public hospital were left stranded of internet access because of the fire, the connection was lost for 28 to 50 hours, as reported.

    “After the incident, public security officials seized Lan’s instrument of crime — a lighter,” according to the court in Cenxi.

    It is reported that for destroying public telecommunications facilities, Lan was later slapped with a seven-year jail term.



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    Djokovic admits ‘errors’ as he fights to avoid Australian deportatio

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    Novak Djokovic is currently ranked as world No. 1 by the Association of Tennis Professionals. — Reuters/File
    • Novak Djokovic admits errors in his travel papers and to meet journalist after claimed COVID-19.
    • Australian government ponders whether to cancel his visa, again and throw him out of the country.
    • Many Australians are angered about Djokovic’s vaccine exemption.

    Novak Djokovic on Wednesday admitted “errors” in his travel papers and to meeting a journalist after a claimed coronavirus infection, as he battled to stay in Australia and fight for a record 21st Grand Slam title.

    The men’s world number one made the admission in an Instagram post as attention focused on his movements before he flew to Melbourne for the Australian Open.

    Djokovic said his team had offered fresh information to the Australian government, which is pondering whether to cancel his visa, again, and throw him out of the country.

    “We are living in challenging times in a global pandemic and sometimes these mistakes can occur,” the unvaccinated 34-year-old said in a statement released as he practised on the courts of the Open, which starts Monday.

    The Serbian star flew into Australia a week ago claiming a vaccine exemption because of a positive PCR test result on December 16.

    Border agents rejected his exemption saying a recent infection was an insufficient reason, tore up his visa and placed him in a detention centre.

    But the vaccine-sceptic Djokovic’s high-powered legal team dramatically overturned the visa decision in court on Monday on a procedural matter related to his airport interview.

    Now, Immigration Minister Alex Hawke says he is considering cancelling the visa another time, as fresh doubts emerge about Djokovic’s travels in the two weeks before he arrived in Australia.

    In an update to Australian media, Hawke’s spokesman acknowledged receiving “lengthy further submissions” from the player’s lawyers.

    “Naturally, this will affect the timeframe for a decision,” he said.

    ‘Error of judgement’

    Djokovic, a nine-time Australian Open champion, described reports about his post-infection outings in Serbia as “misinformation”.

    On the day of his claimed positive test in Serbia, he appeared at a ceremony to honour him with stamps bearing his image. The following day he attended a youth tennis event. He appeared at both apparently without a mask.

    Djokovic, who made no mention of the stamp ceremony, said he only received the PCR test result after attending the children’s tennis event.

    But he admitted that he also went ahead with an interview with French sports daily L’Equipe on December 18.

    “I felt obliged to go ahead and conduct the L’Equipe interview as I didn´t want to let the journalist down but did ensure I socially distanced and wore a mask except when my photograph was being taken,” he said.

    “On reflection, this was an error of judgement and I accept that I should have rescheduled this commitment.”

    The journalist who carried out the L’Equipe interview, Franck Ramella, said Djokovic’s representatives had told him not to ask about Covid-19 vaccinations.

    Ramella said: “The instructions were clear — no questions about vaccination.”

    The reporter said he had been unaware at the time of the interview that Djokovic was Covid-positive.

    Support team ‘made mistake’

    The tennis ace also admitted a mistake on his Australian travel declaration, in which a box was ticked indicating that he had not, or would not, travel in the 14 days before flying to Melbourne.

    In fact, social media posts and reports show he flew from Serbia to Spain during that period.

    “This was submitted by my support team on my behalf,” Djokovic said.

    “My agent sincerely apologises for the administrative mistake in ticking the incorrect box about my previous travel before coming to Australia. This was a human error and certainly not deliberate.”

    In another twist, Australian media on Wednesday seized on reporting by Germany’s Der Spiegel newspaper that cast doubt over Djokovic’s positive test.

    The newspaper said it had scanned the QR code on his Serbian PCR test, which it said delivered a negative result, only to change to a positive result an hour later.

    It was not possible to independently verify the Der Spiegel story.

    Appeal options 

    Djokovic’s Instagram post appeared to be aimed at swaying the Australian government to let him stay.

    Leading immigration lawyer Christopher Levingston said the government could cancel Djokovic’s visa on narrow criminal grounds, for example, because the travel declaration was incorrectly completed.

    But the immigration minister may also annul the visa on broader character grounds.

    If Djokovic knowingly dodged Serbia’s quarantine requirement for positive cases, he could be judged to be a risk for potentially not complying with public health orders while in Australia, Levingston said.

    Various options to appeal would be open for both Djokovic and the government, but at the end of the day, the immigration minister can exercise his personal power to cancel the visa.

    Many Australians, who have endured nearly two years of travel bans, restrictions and rolling lockdowns, were angered when they learned of Djokovic’s vaccine exemption.

    Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s government, which faces a general election by May, has been criticised over its handling of the affair.

    Djokovic’s visa ban was overturned only after the government conceded it had acted unreasonably by not giving him the promised time to put his case at the airport.

    Since then, Djokovic’s Covid-19 test and his actions before touching down in Australia have come under greater media scrutiny.



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    Traffic comes to halt as python crosses busy road

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    Representational image of a snake. — iStock/File
    • Traffic comes to halt as python slithers across a busy street.
    • Patience is shown by commuters and they stood still so that python doesn’t get smashed.
    • Kochi has great amount of swampy ground and pythons easily survive there.

    KOCHI: The patience of many commuters of India’s Kochi area of Kerala was put to test after they had to stop their cars and wait for a nearly 6.5-foot-long python to cross a busy street in the city, NDTV reported.

    The Indian rock python — which is a non-venomous snake — was allowed to cross the road peacefully as the traffic stood still. 

    On Sunday night, the incident took place on the busy Seaport-Airport Road in Kochi, NDTV reported.

    On YouTube, a video of the incident has been shared where the whole scene could be witnessed.

    It could be seen that several cars and motorcycles were pulled up in the middle of the road and some of the people could be seen standing still so that the python could cross the road easily without getting smashed.

    After the non-venomous snake reached the other end of the road, it vanished into the bushes.

    Regarding the incident, a forest department official told the New Indian Express that for the past three to four years, snakes, particularly pythons, have often been sighted in Kochi.

    He further added that Kochi has a great amount of swampy ground and pythons easily survive there. They prey on rats, which are plentiful in this area.

    The official added that two to three times a week, they get calls to rescue pythons from the city and neighbouring areas. 



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    Qlik vs. Tableau: 2022 Software Comparison

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    Qlik and Tableau are among the most highly regarded business intelligence and data analytics tools available. In this article, we will compare these two data leaders, and note the ideal user for each.

    To compete in the business intelligence (BI) and data analytics market, vendors must provide functions such as data preparation, data mining, visual exploration, insight generation, and self-service analytics. The marketplace is also demanding cloud-based tools that offer data visualization capabilities and interactive key performance indicator (KPI) dashboards. Intuitive, easy-to-read charts have become a top priority. Tools must also be able to gather data from a wide range of sources.

    Also see: Best Data Mining Tools & Software 

    Qlik vs. Tableau: Key Feature Comparison

    Qlik is an end-to-end data integration and data analytics solution for modern BI. It delivers real-time insights and automation through its Active Intelligence Platform, which leverages artificial intelligence and the cloud.

    Unlike many other BI platforms on the market that rely on SQL, Qlik’s engine can work with any data source in its existing format, allowing users to execute analytics on all their data within Qlik. The company makes it available in several ways. In addition to SaaS, there is a choice of multi-cloud and on-premises options.

    The Qlik Sense data analytics platform includes an associative analytics engine, AI capabilities, and operates in a high-performance cloud platform. It empowers executives, decision-makers, analysts, and staffers to freely search and explore insights to help promote digital transformation.

    Tableau helps people see and understand data. It offers visual analytics with AI, data management, and collaboration. At the heart of Tableau is a proprietary technology called VizQL that makes interactive data visualization an integral part of understanding data. A traditional analysis tool forces you to analyze data in rows and columns, choose a subset of the data to present, organize that data into a table, then create a chart from that table. VizQL skips those steps and creates a visual representation right away, providing visual feedback as you analyze.

    Tableau offers an integrated data analytics and AI suite. AI-powered analytics lowers the barrier to data science techniques, enabling business users and analysts to make smarter decisions faster. It goes beyond creating charts through a series of templates and wizards to offer control and customization around insights. Full functionality can be deployed on any cloud (private or public cloud) or on-premises, used on Mac or PC.

    Qlik Sense’s AI assistant, called Insight Advisor, offers insight generation, task automation, and search and natural-language interaction. Users can combine and load data, create smart visualizations, and drag and drop to build analytics apps. It also offers interactive mobile analytics, and embedded analytics; its Associative Engine allows people to explore in any data direction.

    Qlik’s AI-infused cloud analytics, then, are all about moving from passive backward-looking data consumption to activating relevant and timely data for real-time decision making. Its open cloud architecture means IT and users can leverage analytics with their cloud platform of choice such as AWS, Google Cloud Platform or Microsoft Azure.

    Tableau has over 80 native data connectors, which allows users to access data from a great many sources. Web Data connectors allow you to connect to myriad data sources. Users have the option of either ingesting data into the data engine or pushing queries to their databases.

    Tableau is now owned by Salesforce. This has positive implications in terms of integration with Salesforce and opening the door to a large new customer base. However, it remains to be seen if Salesforce will allow Tableau to grow or will be more inclined to view it as a value add to its own primary offerings.

    Also see: Data Mining Techniques

    Qlik vs. Tableau: Comparing Analyst Comments

    Qlik has been rated a Leader by Gartner for many years. The latest Gartner Magic Quadrant for Analytics and Business Intelligence Platforms again places it in that category. Qlik was also named by Gartner as a Challenger in the 2021 MQ for Data Integration Tools. A recent BARC survey had Qlik earning six number one rankings and 45 leading positions in six peer groups in the annual survey of some 2,500 BI and analytics practitioners.

    Overall, Gartner praises Qlik’s strong product vision for ML- and AI-driven augmentation, and a deployment flexibility that doesn’t limit customers to any particular cloud. Acquisitions of RoxAI, Knarr Analytics, and Blender.io are enhancing capabilities for alerting, continuous intelligence, and SaaS platform integration. This is serving to expand its capabilities across the data and analytics pipeline. In addition, its Data Literacy Program is designed to educate users on BI and analytics and eliminate the need for data science degrees in analytics. Gartner notes, however, that Tableau has greater market momentum based on Gartner search and client inquiry data.

    Tableau is another Leader in the Gartner Magic Quadrant, graded a little higher than Qlik. The analyst firm gave it high marks for having a sleek user experience that enables users to perform analysis seamlessly. It also does well on advanced visualization capabilities, courtesy of its VizQL engine. On the marketing front, Gartner believes Tableau has stronger momentum than Qlik. With more than 145,000 people attending its online user conference, and its free Tableau Public platform including more than three million data visualizations, Gartner also gives Tableau praise for usability. Finally, the company has put a lot of time and effort into its partnership with Salesforce. Tableau Viz Lightning, for example, was developed to simplify integration of Tableau visualizations into Salesforce.

    Qlik vs. Tableau: Pricing

    Although Qlik Sense offers core analytic and BI platform capabilities in a single license, additional licensing is needed for add-on capabilities, such as Qlik Catalog, Qlik Insight Advisor Chat, and Qlik NPrinting for Mode 1 reporting, if deployed on-premises, according to Gartner. However, Qlik’s SaaS platform simplifies everything into a standard subscription. Yet product pricing complexity is a complaint that is sometimes leveled at Qlik.

    Tableau is a little more open than Qlik on pricing. It offers enterprise subscription plans with set prices. Still, Gartner commented on premium pricing concerns raised among its customers. For example, the company has been introducing Tableau CRM priced at up to $150 per user per month.

    Qlik vs. Tableau: Comparing Similarities and Differences

    Both Qlik and Tableau are highly capable BI and analytics solutions that are among the best in the business. Users can’t go far wrong choosing either one. They are similar in many ways:

    • Both companies enable customers to create interactive dashboards.
    • Both offer the flexibility to deploy on-premises or with any major cloud provider.
    • Both have added augmented analytics, using artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies to make data analysis easier on their platforms.
    • Both offer data management capabilities to help organizations curate and govern the data analyzed by their products.

    Tableau claims that it works better than Qlik with modern databases. This is because Tableau can connect to data live (performing queries in-database and returning results in real-time) or in-memory (ingesting data from source systems into Tableau). This allows customers to control performance, cost, and data freshness more easily than with Qlik. While both Tableau and Qlik can create dashboards, Tableau believes VizQL allows non-technical people to explore data without the help of IT. Qlik, at times, may require technical expertise to analyze data.

    Another way to compare them is to look at their user communities. Qlik’s user community has a large cohort of IT developers and systems integrators. This indicates a strong focus on back-end integration and IT smarts. Tableau’s massive fanbase, on the other hand, is more focused on helping customers overcome roadblocks that slow the adoption of analytics products. While highly generalized, that might be a good way to contrast the platforms. One speaks well to developers and integrators. The other talks to broader, non-technical audience.

    On the other side of the coin, Tableau is less capable as a cloud platform. With its heritage being on-premises deployments, its cloud-hosted solutions are limited mainly to Tableau Online and Tableau CRM. Gartner stated that Tableau lacks a cloud-native architecture for its large on-premises customer base to embrace the cloud’s full benefits.

    Forrester, too, commented that the Qlik Associative Engine stands apart from the competition. Most of the competition relies on search-based BI platforms to provide guided analysis and data exploration. Qlik Sense search, however, is based on data values and relationships, which enables a user to select data points directly from a visualization. Forrester said this, “supports almost unrestricted data exploration.”

    Qlik vs. Tableau: Who is the Ideal User for Each? 

    Tableau targets business users who need an intuitive platform to stay more informed with data. Ideal users are non-technical business people who are interested in making smarter decisions through better understanding of data. And with its Salesforce ownership and greater Salesforce integration, users of Salesforce would be obviously inclined more towards it than Qlik.

    Qlik could be characterized as more of a platform for IT personnel and data analysts who respond to business requests for data and analysis. However, its cloud architecture is more suited to organizations that are heavily invested in the cloud already. As such, Qlik offers greater scalability and flexibility in the cloud.

    Also see: Guide to Data Pipelines



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